What I learned when I conquered the world's toughest triathlon | Minda Dentler

A 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bicycle ride and then a full-length marathon on hot, dry ground -- with no breaks in between: the legendary Ironman triathlon in Kona, Hawaii, is a bucket list goal for champion athletes. But when Minda Dentler decided to take it on, she had bigger aspirations than just another medal around her neck. She tells the story of how she conquered this epic race, and what it inspired her to do next.

What I learned when I conquered the world's toughest triathlon | Minda Dentler 2018/03/05 17:04

How to connect with depressed friends | Bill Bernat

Want to connect with a depressed friend but not sure how to relate to them? Comedian and storyteller Bill Bernat has a few suggestions. Learn some dos and don'ts for talking to people living with depression -- and handle your next conversation with grace and maybe a bit of humor.

How to connect with depressed friends | Bill Bernat 2018/03/02 21:50

How we became sisters | Felice Belle and Jennifer Murphy

Poets Felice Belle and Jennifer Murphy perform excerpts from their play "Other Women," which is created and directed by Monica L. Williams. In a captivating journey, they weave together stories full of laughter, loyalty, tragedy and heartbreak, recalling the moments that made them sisters.

How we became sisters | Felice Belle and Jennifer Murphy 2018/03/02 16:53

To learn is to be free | Shameem Akhtar

Shameem Akhtar posed as a boy during her early childhood in Pakistan so she could enjoy the privileges Pakistani girls are rarely afforded: to play outside and attend school. In an eye-opening, personal talk, Akhtar recounts how the opportunity to get an education altered the course of her life -- and ultimately changed the culture of her village, where today every young girl goes to school.

To learn is to be free | Shameem Akhtar 2018/03/01 21:59

How we look kilometers below the Antarctic ice sheet | Dustin Schroeder

Antarctica is a vast and dynamic place, but radar technologies -- from World War II-era film to state-of-the-art miniaturized sensors -- are enabling scientists to observe and understand changes beneath the continent's ice in unprecedented detail. Join radio glaciologist Dustin Schroeder on a flight high above Antarctica and see how ice-penetrating radar is helping us learn about future sea level rise -- and what the melting ice will mean for us all.

How we look kilometers below the Antarctic ice sheet | Dustin Schroeder 2018/03/01 16:59

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